IEEE Aerospace Conference logo
At the Yellowstone Conference Center in Big Sky, Montana, March 04 – March 11, 2017

  • Kristin Wortman

    Principal Professional Staff, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory: Principal professional staff, Space Exploration Sector's Space Mission Assurance group at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory located in Laurel, MD. Support EZIE and Dragonfly NASA missions and several National Security Space missions as the lead software assurance engineer. Adjunct professor, Computer Sciences Department, University of Maryland University College since 2001. B.S., Computer and Information Science; M.S., Software Engineering, University of Maryland University College.

  • Virgil Adumitroaie

    Data Scientist, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Past research in high-speed turbulent combustion modeling, data dimensionality reduction, neural networks, signaling pathways, decision support, climate data assimilation, and scientific software development. Currently working on planetary atmospheric and magnetospheric modeling. Adjunct Lecturer at the Viterbi School of Engineering, USC. Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, University at Buffalo.

  • 10.01 Computational Modeling

    The focus of this session is Computational Modeling in any discipline, with emphasis on the mathematical model of the phenomenology and on the numerical algorithms used for solution. Disciplines include fluid dynamics and fluid/thermal sciences, earth and planetary physics, systems engineering studies, sensor management and sensor modeling, and radar and signal processing.

    • Virgil Adumitroaie

      Data Scientist, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Past research in high-speed turbulent combustion modeling, data dimensionality reduction, neural networks, signaling pathways, decision support, climate data assimilation, and scientific software development. Currently working on planetary atmospheric and magnetospheric modeling. Adjunct Lecturer at the Viterbi School of Engineering, USC. Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, University at Buffalo.

    • Seungwon Lee

      Data Scientist, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Seungwon Lee is a data scientist at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She has over 25 years of experience of research and technology development in computational physics, dynamic systems, statistical data analysis, optimization algorithms, information systems, and high performance computing systems for science and engineering applications. Currently, she is the PI of a NASA ROSES AIST project for developing an ecological projection analytic framework. She is also the PI of a NASA ROSES RDAP project for analyzing Rosetta observation data. In the past, she led several research projects as a PI for the JPL internal Research and Technology Development program and performed innovative research on Earth science data summarization with advanced clustering algorithms, evolutionary optimization methods for spectral retrieval problems and trajectory design, parallel computing for Satellite Orbit Analysis Program. She also contributed to other NASA research projects including the development of a co-location tool for A-Train data and ECMWF outputs, the characterization of cloud properties using NASA’s observational data, development of cloud-related parameterizations for climate models, and the development of a statistical method to quantify the relationships between passive radiometer and active radar measurements for hurricane studies. She is the first author or co-author of over 40 refereed publications.

  • 10.02 Innovative Software Engineering and Management Techniques and Practices

    Practices followed during development and management of aerospace software systems vary across the industry. This divide seems to be growing as emerging markets, such as commercial space and cubesats, adopt techniques from other software domains while the traditional aerospace market works to tailor existing processes. Suggested topics covering both experience and research in software engineering and management techniques with both flight and ground system development such as: innovative software architectures, software management techniques to ensure and measure software progress, effective review processes, COTS integration and code reuse strategies, new design methods, and unique approaches to software test and verification. Other software engineering topics will also be considered in this session.

    • Kristin Wortman

      Principal Professional Staff, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory: Principal professional staff, Space Exploration Sector's Space Mission Assurance group at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory located in Laurel, MD. Support EZIE and Dragonfly NASA missions and several National Security Space missions as the lead software assurance engineer. Adjunct professor, Computer Sciences Department, University of Maryland University College since 2001. B.S., Computer and Information Science; M.S., Software Engineering, University of Maryland University College.

    • Ronnie Killough

      Program Director - R&D, Southwest Research Institute: Ronnie Killough is a Program Director in the Space Science Division at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). In his 30+ years at SwRI, Ronnie has developed software for cruise missile simulators, space shuttle control center systems, and unmanned spacecraft. Until 2014 he was Director of the Communications and Embedded Systems department in which he was responsible for oversight of research and development of network-centric systems, tactical communications systems, cyber security, and high-reliability software. Ronnie returned to his passion for space and served as software systems lead and flight director for the Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) mission which launched in December 2016. He is currently Project Manager for a Heliophysics SMEX mission called Polarimeter to Unify the Corina and Heliosphere (PUNCH), a constellation of four microsatellites that will create 3D images of the solar wind, slated for launch in 2025.

  • 10.03 Software Architecture and Design

    Appropriate software architecture is critical to the design, development and evolution of all software systems, and its role in the engineering of software-intensive applications in the aerospace domain has become increasingly important. This session solicits novel ideas on the foundations, languages, models, techniques, tools, and applications of software architecture technology. Topics include software architecture for space mission systems; architecture across software, system and enterprise boundaries; architectural patterns, styles and viewpoints; architecture frameworks; design reasoning, capturing and sharing design decisions; and open architectures, product-line architectures, and systems of systems software architects’ roles and responsibilities.

    • Martin Stelzer

      Research Associate, German Aerospace Center (DLR): Martin Stelzer studied computer science at FH Ingolstadt and the University of Hagen and received his M.Sc. Degree in 2012. Since 2007 he has been working at the German Aerospace Center in the field of onboard software frameworks and was involved in the space projects ROKVISS, Kontur-2, and EROSS IOD.

    • Peter Lehner

      Team Lead Mobile Manipulators, German Aerospace Center (DLR): Peter Lehner is the Mobile Manipulators team lead at the Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics, German Aerospace Center (DLR). Before he joined DLR in 2014, he received his master's degree in Computer Engineering from the Technical University of Berlin in 2014. His current research activities include developing methods for autonomous motion generation for mobile manipulation systems to empower mobile robots to autonomously interact with their environment.

  • 10.04 Software Quality, Reliability and Safety Engineering and Other Illities

    The focus of this session is to share systematic practices followed in aerospace to ensure an adequate confidence level that a software system conforms to its requirements and will perform in a safe and reliable manner. Software quality, reliability and safety engineering covers methodologies and techniques used for assessment of the development cycle, verification, validation and test programs, standards, models, certifications, tools, data analysis and risk management. This session is also a forum for discussion on other illities, such as software maintainability.

    • Kristin Wortman

      Principal Professional Staff, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory: Principal professional staff, Space Exploration Sector's Space Mission Assurance group at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory located in Laurel, MD. Support EZIE and Dragonfly NASA missions and several National Security Space missions as the lead software assurance engineer. Adjunct professor, Computer Sciences Department, University of Maryland University College since 2001. B.S., Computer and Information Science; M.S., Software Engineering, University of Maryland University College.

    • Robert Klar

      Institute Engineer, Southwest Research Institute: Robert Klar has over 28 years of experience in the areas of software engineering, real-time operating systems, embedded systems, signal processing, image processing, computer networking, and communications. He has contributed to flight software for many space missions including PUNCH, CYGNSS, MMS, WISE, Kepler, New Horizons, Orbital Express, Fermi, Swift, and IMAGE. Robert has a B.S. in Computer Engineering from Texas A&M and an M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Saint Mary’s University. He is currently pursuing additional graduate work in Machine Learning at the University of Texas at San Antonio.

  • 10.05 Model-based Systems and Software Engineering

    This session is concerned with the application, or potential application, of advanced model-based approaches, methodologies, techniques, languages, and tools to the aerospace domain. Topics ranging from theoretical and conceptual work in these areas to specific, concrete applications, in scope from small software systems to complex monolithic systems to large system-of-systems, are welcome. Other driving current themes include: coordination and usage of multiple types of models, e.g., digital twins, descriptive versus behavioral models; the use of MBSE simulations and analyses in support of architecture development; the application of information visualization techniques for improved MBSE deliverables; the use of MBSE in specialized domains such as fault protection or electrical systems engineering. The Session's areas of interest including model-based architecture and analysis, design, control systems, verification and testing, simulation, domain specific languages and transformations, aircraft, spacecraft, instruments, flight systems, ground systems, planning and execution, guidance and navigation, and fault management.

    • Aleksandra Markina Khusid

      Department Manager, MITRE Corporation: Aleksandra Markina-Khusid received the B.S. degree in physics, M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering, and the M.S. degree in engineering and management, all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA 1999, 2001, 2005, and 2015 respectively. She leads the Systems and Mission Analysis Department, MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA, USA. Her research interests include analytical and quantitative systems engineering and mission engineering, including systems of systems engineering, trade space analysis, and decision support as enabled by the modern digital engineering approaches.

    • Hongman Kim

      Systems Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Hongman Kim is a systems engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Since he joined JPL in 2014, Hongman worked on a number of software development projects including concept design study environment and ontology-based engineering data integration. Currently, he works as software architect of Ingenium that provides a Web-based test procedure authoring and execution environment for system level testing and integration of JPL flight projects. Before joining JPL, he was a project manager at Phoenix Integration, Inc., where he led development of model-based systems engineering (MBSE) technology. He also worked on a number of government funded projects including points cloud visualization, distributed computing, and design optimization. He holds a PhD degree in aerospace engineering from Virginia Tech, and MS and BS degrees in aerospace engineering from Seoul National University.

  • 10.06 Machine Learning / Artificial Intelligence (ML/AI) for Aerospace Applications

    This session considers how to create state-of-the-art single and multi-agent system technologies necessary for developing algorithms, software, or hardware for intelligent, adaptive, and learning systems. Application areas include single and multiple homogeneous or heterogenous platforms and their related systems, e.g., ground movers / stations, single or constellations of spacecraft/satellites, unmanned aerial systems (UAS), etc., including mission systems, and autonomy. Techniques considered will include, but are not limited to, all artificial intelligence, machine learning, and reinforcement learning paradigms, genetic programming and algorithms, swarm intelligence, probabilistic AI, human trust in AI, cooperative multi-agent systems, and training, testing, & verification tools and methodologies. This session invites papers on best practices towards implementing new state-of-the-art autonomy and intelligence systems for aerospace. Papers on novel AI/ML algorithms for single and multi-agent systems including centralized and decentralized protocols, guaranteed stability, robustness, and performance bounds, and comparison with conventional closed-loop control systems are of particular interest.

    • Daniel Clancy

      Senior Research Engineer, Georgia Tech Research Institute: Dan has worked in the aerospace / defense industry for over 25 years. His research interests include machine learning and artificial intelligence; advance battle management, command and control systems; multi-agent decision and game theory; and information fusion, advanced tracking, data association, and target ID techniques. He previously worked for Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company in Fort Worth, TX, where he was a lead designer of the information fusion system for the F-35 Lightning II. He has been an adjunct professor at Texas Christian University in the Department of Engineering. He received his B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Michigan Technological University in 1988, his M.S. degree in electrical engineering from Boston University in 1991, and his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the Ohio State University in 1997.

    • Georges Labrèche

      Spacecraft Operations Engineer, Tanagra Space / European Space Agency: Georges Labrèche develops and operationalizes AI technology demonstrators on-board the European Space Agency's OPS-SAT Space Lab. His research focuses on leveraging edge computing for in-orbit machine learning and autonomous decision-making. He received his B.S. in Software Engineering from the University of Ottawa, Canada, M.A. in International Affairs from the New School University in New York, NY, and M.S. in Spacecraft Design from Luleå University of Technology in Kiruna, Sweden. He founded Tanagra Space, an Estonian-based AI consultancy that supports the OPS-SAT mission control team at ESOC in Darmstadt, Germany. Georges lives in Queens, NY.

  • 10.07 Human-Systems Interaction

    Humans are the most critical element in system safety, reliability, and performance. Their creativity, adaptability, and problem-solving capabilities are key to resilient operations across the different aerospace applications. This session focuses on the technologies and techniques leading to effective interfaces and interaction between humans and spacecraft, robots, and other aerospace systems. Specific topics of interests include HCI-HMI, multimodal sensory integration such as vision, haptics and audio, HCI-HMI for tele-operation interfaces, virtual, augmented and mixed reality environments, scientific visualization and natural user interfaces as applied to design, production, operations, and analysis, as well as training and for decision support. Novel solutions/experiences from other domains and their application in aerospace domain, specifically contributing to an efficient human systems interaction are also of interest.

    • Janki Dodiya

      Professor for Augmented/Virtual Reality and Human Computer Interaction, IU International University of Applied Science: Janki Dodiya is a Professor of Augmented/Virtual Reality and Human Computer Interaction at IU International University in Germany. She received her PhD in Computer Science in the topic of Virtual Environments in 2011, from University of Reading, UK. She thereafter continued her research at the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) for 10 years for the Institute of Transportation Systems and Department of Software for Space Systems & Interactive Visualization, DLR, researching design and evaluation for space systems such as multimodal interaction techniques for a virtual reality simulation for on-orbit servicing (VROOS) and transportation systems such as interaction design for future autonomous vehicles. Her current research interest includes, human computer interaction/multimodal interaction, virtual reality, artificial intelligence and usability engineering including application areas such as Aerospace, Transportation Education, Humanitarian and Art.

    • Andreas Gerndt

      Head of Department, German Aerospace Center (DLR): Prof. Dr. Andreas Gerndt is the head of the department "Visual Computing and Engineering" at German Aerospace Center (DLR). He received his degree in computer science from Technical University, Darmstadt, Germany in 1993. In the position of a research scientist, he also worked at the Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics (IGD) in Germany. Thereafter, he was a software engineer for several companies with focus on Software Engineering and Computer Graphics. In 1999 he continued his studies in Virtual Reality and Scientific Visualization at RWTH Aachen University, Germany, where he received his doctoral degree in computer science. After two years of interdisciplinary research activities as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Louisiana, Lafayette, USA, he returned to Germany in 2008 to work for DLR in the domain of aerospace software research. Since 2019, he is also Professor in High-Performance Visualization at University of Bremen, Germany.

  • 10.08 Image Processing and Computer Vision

    The focus of this session is both theoretical and experimental work on Image Processing and Computer Vision in aerospace applications. The disciplines include, but not limited to image-based navigation, image classification, image reconstruction, image segmentation, feature extraction, image compression, object detection and tracking, image correlation, coding and limitations, computational complexity, adaptive algorithms, video coding (e.g., MPEG, H.265), hardware and bandwidth limitations, key improvements, contributions, and lesson learned.

    • Samuel Bibelhauser

      Engineer, JHU-APL: Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Electrical Engineering from the University of Louisville in Kentucky. Internships at NASA Langley and NASA Goddard, including work on drones and wind tunnels. Work at JHUAPL includes imaging systems, flight software, and drones.

    • Marco Sewtz

      Scientific Staff, German Aerospace Center - DLR: Marco Sewtz is the lead for software and interfaces of the new lunar exploration rover at the German Aerospace Center (DLR). He received his B.Eng. at the University of Applied Sciences of Munich and his M.Sc. at the Technical University of Munich. His interests focuses on SLAM and multi-modal perception of the environment. Before his current role, he worked as an electrical designer for high-performance processing modules for space hardware at Airbus Defence and Space.

    • Timothy Chase

      Ph.D. Candidate/Computer Engineer, University at Buffalo/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center: Timothy is a computer engineer at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and a Ph.D. student in Computer Science and Engineering at the University at Buffalo in the Distributed RObotics and Networked Embedded Sensing (DRONES) Lab under Dr. Karthik Dantu and the Advanced Navigation and Control Systems Lab under Dr. John Crassidis. He received his B.S. in Computer Science and M.S. in Computer Science and Engineering from the University at Buffalo. His research interests include spacecraft perception and autonomy, optical navigation systems, simultaneous localization and mapping, and embedded computer vision.

  • Andrew Hess

    President, The Hess PHM Group, Inc.: Consultant to government and industry on advanced diagnostics, prognostics, data and predictive analytics, CBM, smart manufacturing, health and asset management of machines and engineering systems. Previously program office lead for the JSF PHM effort. Current President of the PHM Society.

  • Wolfgang Fink

    Associate Professor, University of Arizona: Professor Fink is the inaugural Edward & Maria Keonjian Endowed Chair, University of Arizona with joint appointments in the Departments of ECE, BME, SIE, AME, and Ophthalmology & Vision Science. Prof. Fink is named AIMBE Fellow, PHMS Fellow, SPIE Lifetime Fellow, ARVO Fellow, NAI Fellow, UA da Vinci Fellow, UA ACABI Fellow, and Senior Member IEEE. He holds a Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics, University of Tübingen, Germany. Among numerous awards Prof. Fink received: NASA Space Flight Awareness (SFA) Launch Honoree Award in 2002, co-recipient of the 2009 R&D Magazine’s R&D 100 and R&D 100 Editors’ Choice Award both for the DOE-funded Artificial Retina Project, co-recipient of the 2009 NASA Board Award for pioneering work on a disruptive autonomous space exploration paradigm, co-winner of the $200,000 DOE/NREL-sponsored E-ROBOT Prize in 2021, and recipient of the 2023 SPIE Meinel Technology Achievement Award.

  • 11.01 PHM for Aerospace Systems, Subsystems, Components, Electronics, and Structures

    Advanced Diagnostics and PHM can be and is applied separately or concurrently at the device, component, subsystem, structure, system and/or total platform levels. This session will give PHM developers, practitioners, integrators, and users a chance to discuss their capabilities and experiences at any or all of these application levels. Discussion of the integration of PHM capabilities across these various levels of application is welcome and encouraged. Applications involving propulsion systems, fuel management, flight control, EHAS, drive systems, and structures are particularly solicited.

    • Andrew Hess

      President, The Hess PHM Group, Inc.: Consultant to government and industry on advanced diagnostics, prognostics, data and predictive analytics, CBM, smart manufacturing, health and asset management of machines and engineering systems. Previously program office lead for the JSF PHM effort. Current President of the PHM Society.

  • 11.02 PHM for Autonomous Platforms and Control Systems Applications

    This session focuses on diagnostics and prognostics for autonomous system applications and control systems. This would include autonomous system architectures, electronic controls, control systems, and electronic systems for both the item under control and the controlling system. Methods for autonomous decision making, fault detection, rate of progression, and consequence or mission risk are encouraged. The session also is looking for novel technical approaches to use diagnostic and prognostic information to provide control input adjustments that can slow or reverse fault progression.

    • Derek De Vries

      Senior Fellow, Nothrop Grumman Propulsion Systems: Mr. Derek R. DeVries, P.E., Senior Fellow and Discipline Owner for Avionics and Controls at Northrop Grumman Propulsion Systems. Senior Member of IEEE with over 30 years’ experience in the Aerospace Industry in Operation, Integration, and Development of Space Launch Systems. PHM Society Fellow, Board of Directors, and Honored as a Luminary Speaker for the PHM 2015 Conference. B.Sc Electrical Engineering from University of Utah, and M.Sc. Electrical Engineering from Utah State University. Industrial Advisory Board Member for the University of Utah Electrical Engineering, AIAA Standards Committee NATO Scientific Achievement Award 2016 "Application of Integrated Munitions health Management", Member for AIAA “S-122-2006 Direct Current Power Systems for Earth-Orbiting Satellites”, 15 U.S./Foreign Patents, and AIAA 2001 JPC Arthur D. Rhea Best Paper Award for "Ordnance Components and Systems". Research/Development interests include advanced Avionics and Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) of integrated systems.

  • 11.03 PHM System Design Attributes, Architectures, and Assessments

    Design of complex systems, such as aircraft and space vehicles, requires complex trade-offs among requirements related to performance, safety, reliability, and life cycle cost. The development of effective architectures and implementation strategies are extremely important. This session will focus on the application of methods such as testability, diagnosability, embedding sensors, prognostics, remaining useful life estimates used to design complex aerospace systems, and architectures to design, enable, and implement complex aerospace systems. We invite papers discussing new methodologies, lessons learned in application of health management methods in system design, and operational experience with health management capabilities embedded into systems early in the design process.

    • Andrew Hess

      President, The Hess PHM Group, Inc.: Consultant to government and industry on advanced diagnostics, prognostics, data and predictive analytics, CBM, smart manufacturing, health and asset management of machines and engineering systems. Previously program office lead for the JSF PHM effort. Current President of the PHM Society.

    • Derek De Vries

      Senior Fellow, Nothrop Grumman Propulsion Systems: Mr. Derek R. DeVries, P.E., Senior Fellow and Discipline Owner for Avionics and Controls at Northrop Grumman Propulsion Systems. Senior Member of IEEE with over 30 years’ experience in the Aerospace Industry in Operation, Integration, and Development of Space Launch Systems. PHM Society Fellow, Board of Directors, and Honored as a Luminary Speaker for the PHM 2015 Conference. B.Sc Electrical Engineering from University of Utah, and M.Sc. Electrical Engineering from Utah State University. Industrial Advisory Board Member for the University of Utah Electrical Engineering, AIAA Standards Committee NATO Scientific Achievement Award 2016 "Application of Integrated Munitions health Management", Member for AIAA “S-122-2006 Direct Current Power Systems for Earth-Orbiting Satellites”, 15 U.S./Foreign Patents, and AIAA 2001 JPC Arthur D. Rhea Best Paper Award for "Ordnance Components and Systems". Research/Development interests include advanced Avionics and Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) of integrated systems.

  • 11.04 Non-Destructive Testing and Sensor Technologies for PHM Applications

    This session is designed to bring together researchers and engineers developing sensors applicable to SHM and IVHM. Papers are invited on MEMS, MOEMS, nanotechnology, BIOS, quantum dots, chemical sensors, optical sensors, and imaging sensors that can be integrated with nondestructive testing applications for structural health monitoring and diagnostics. Description of novel and disruptive sensor technologies is solicited.

    • Morteza Safai

      Sensors Engineer / Technical Fellow, Boeing Company: Senior Sensors Engineer & Technical Fellow at the Boeing Research and Technology. 30 years of experience with opto electrical sensors, x-ray CT, X-ray backscattering, X-ray line scans, infrared, laser, MEMS, UT and nondestructive testing and Imaging for aerospace, food and medical industries. Holds over 400 patent, patents pending and publications. BS and MS Physics University of Utah.

  • 11.05 PHM for Non-Aerospace Applications

    This session seeks contributions in non-aerospace but related applications, e.g., automotive industry, trains, marine, oil & gas, etc. Both programmatic and technology presentations are solicited, particularly those focused on capabilities, cost benefits, and lessons learned.

    • Andrew Hess

      President, The Hess PHM Group, Inc.: Consultant to government and industry on advanced diagnostics, prognostics, data and predictive analytics, CBM, smart manufacturing, health and asset management of machines and engineering systems. Previously program office lead for the JSF PHM effort. Current President of the PHM Society.

  • 11.06 PHM for Commercial Space Applications

    This session seeks papers on diagnostics, prognostics, health management (PHM) and autonomous fault management for satellites, satellite in-space servicing, and other commercial space applications (e.g., asteroid mining, etc.). Papers are sought in the areas of satellites, launch vehicles, and other new space ventures (e.g., tourism, natural resource exploitation). Papers may address research, actual flight experience, and future planning related to satellite and launch vehicle PHM and fault management.

    • Wolfgang Fink

      Associate Professor, University of Arizona: Professor Fink is the inaugural Edward & Maria Keonjian Endowed Chair, University of Arizona with joint appointments in the Departments of ECE, BME, SIE, AME, and Ophthalmology & Vision Science. Prof. Fink is named AIMBE Fellow, PHMS Fellow, SPIE Lifetime Fellow, ARVO Fellow, NAI Fellow, UA da Vinci Fellow, UA ACABI Fellow, and Senior Member IEEE. He holds a Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics, University of Tübingen, Germany. Among numerous awards Prof. Fink received: NASA Space Flight Awareness (SFA) Launch Honoree Award in 2002, co-recipient of the 2009 R&D Magazine’s R&D 100 and R&D 100 Editors’ Choice Award both for the DOE-funded Artificial Retina Project, co-recipient of the 2009 NASA Board Award for pioneering work on a disruptive autonomous space exploration paradigm, co-winner of the $200,000 DOE/NREL-sponsored E-ROBOT Prize in 2021, and recipient of the 2023 SPIE Meinel Technology Achievement Award.

    • Andrew Hess

      President, The Hess PHM Group, Inc.: Consultant to government and industry on advanced diagnostics, prognostics, data and predictive analytics, CBM, smart manufacturing, health and asset management of machines and engineering systems. Previously program office lead for the JSF PHM effort. Current President of the PHM Society.

    • Derek De Vries

      Senior Fellow, Nothrop Grumman Propulsion Systems: Mr. Derek R. DeVries, P.E., Senior Fellow and Discipline Owner for Avionics and Controls at Northrop Grumman Propulsion Systems. Senior Member of IEEE with over 30 years’ experience in the Aerospace Industry in Operation, Integration, and Development of Space Launch Systems. PHM Society Fellow, Board of Directors, and Honored as a Luminary Speaker for the PHM 2015 Conference. B.Sc Electrical Engineering from University of Utah, and M.Sc. Electrical Engineering from Utah State University. Industrial Advisory Board Member for the University of Utah Electrical Engineering, AIAA Standards Committee NATO Scientific Achievement Award 2016 "Application of Integrated Munitions health Management", Member for AIAA “S-122-2006 Direct Current Power Systems for Earth-Orbiting Satellites”, 15 U.S./Foreign Patents, and AIAA 2001 JPC Arthur D. Rhea Best Paper Award for "Ordnance Components and Systems". Research/Development interests include advanced Avionics and Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) of integrated systems.

  • 11.07 PHM for Human Health and Performance

    This session is an effort to bridge PHM to Space Medicine as part of Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) and healthcare domains as applied to High Value Human Asset. PHM4HHP is focused on tracking status of very healthy individuals 24/7, as well as ensuring a sustained top-level performance required on manned space exploration missions. Papers are sought that show how systems engineering and MBSE with PHM techniques and methodologies, such as predictive analytics, predictive diagnostics, root cause analysis, virtual sensors, data and information fusion, data mining, and big data analytics with computationally generated biomarkers can serve as a scientific and engineering foundation for building both evidence-based and analytics-based individual health maintenance/support for human assets. Objectives include developing and demonstrating PHM capabilities for assessing, tracking, predicting, and ultimately improving long-term individual human health status to ensure mission success.

    • Alexandre Popov

      NASA Emeritus Docent at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center and AIAA Systems Engineering Technical Committee (SETC) Member, McGill University: currently working on PHM-based technologies with predictive diagnostics capability to maintain/support crew health on the ISS program and future manned space exploration missions. His efforts on "PHM for Astronauts" project within US/Canadian/Russian collaboration framework are focused on a paradigm shift from telemedicine to HH&P autonomy based on systems engineering concepts, methods and techniques, which are to identify precursors and computationally generated biomarkers of impending health issues, that otherwise would have gone undetected. Contributed to three manned space programs: BURAN space transportation system (1983-1988), Mir space station (1988-1998), and the ISS program at RSC-Energia (1996-1998), Lockheed Martin Canada (2000-2003) and Canadian Space Agency (CSA) (2003-2014). Ran a project enabling Crew Electronic Health Records (CEHR) technology on the ISS program and led CSA efforts on system requirements and conceptual prototype development. AIAA SETC member since 2009. AIAA Senior Member.

    • Wolfgang Fink

      Associate Professor, University of Arizona: Professor Fink is the inaugural Edward & Maria Keonjian Endowed Chair, University of Arizona with joint appointments in the Departments of ECE, BME, SIE, AME, and Ophthalmology & Vision Science. Prof. Fink is named AIMBE Fellow, PHMS Fellow, SPIE Lifetime Fellow, ARVO Fellow, NAI Fellow, UA da Vinci Fellow, UA ACABI Fellow, and Senior Member IEEE. He holds a Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics, University of Tübingen, Germany. Among numerous awards Prof. Fink received: NASA Space Flight Awareness (SFA) Launch Honoree Award in 2002, co-recipient of the 2009 R&D Magazine’s R&D 100 and R&D 100 Editors’ Choice Award both for the DOE-funded Artificial Retina Project, co-recipient of the 2009 NASA Board Award for pioneering work on a disruptive autonomous space exploration paradigm, co-winner of the $200,000 DOE/NREL-sponsored E-ROBOT Prize in 2021, and recipient of the 2023 SPIE Meinel Technology Achievement Award.

  • 11.08 PHM and Digital Engineering and Transformation

    This session solicits contributions in the areas of PHM applications focused around the recent Digital Twin and Digital Thread paradigm, Model Based System Engineering, and Enterprise-wide Digital Transformation in aerospace and associated industries. Of particular interest are solutions, architectures, and technologies that leverage or enhance the use of DTs and MBSE for end-to-end PHM management and the delivery of enhanced overall situation awareness.

    • Andrew Hess

      President, The Hess PHM Group, Inc.: Consultant to government and industry on advanced diagnostics, prognostics, data and predictive analytics, CBM, smart manufacturing, health and asset management of machines and engineering systems. Previously program office lead for the JSF PHM effort. Current President of the PHM Society.

    • Mark Walker

      Director AI, Autonomous Systems, End to End Enterprise Solutions: Mark Walker received his BSEE from Cal Poly University, Pomona (1990), and his MSCompEng from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (1994), where he specialized in machine intelligence. He has been working in applied artificial intelligence since 1989, and has co-authored four patents in the field. His work with HUMS and PHM began with BFGoodrich Aerospace, Vergennes, VT in 1996. He also worked 6 years as Senior Consulting Engineer for expert system manufacturer Gensym Corporation and 10 years as Lead Engineer, Intelligent Systems for General Atomics, where he led GA in the development of reusable PHM systems applied to various industries. He founded D2K Technologies in 2014, a solution provider of intelligent model-based reasoning systems for mission critical systems. D2K was acquired by End to End Enterprise Solutions (E3S) in 2023, for whom he currently serves as Director, AI and Autonomous Systems. He also serves as a PHM and AO SME for NASA, with active projects at SSC, JSC, and KSC. He resides with his family in Oceanside, California.

  • 11.09 Panel: PHM from a Practitioner’s Perspective – a Potpourri of Capabilities, Issues, Case Studies, and Lessons Learned

    Practitioners in the PHM field are solicited to share their experiences and observations as part of a distinguished panel of experts. A short presentation will be required of all participants that describes their focus topic within the PHM and CBM+ domains. This session will cover a broad range of research, lessons-learned experiences and application topics covering the challenges and innovative engineering and/or business approaches associated with the development and implementation of PHM capabilities and CBM+ architectures. The session will feature presentations by senior leaders in the field and a panel discussion. Panel members from PHM communities, academia, government, and industry, will focus on strategies that have resolved or will resolve historical issues, and challenges, and provide insight. Interested parties should contact the session organizers.

    • Andrew Hess

      President, The Hess PHM Group, Inc.: Consultant to government and industry on advanced diagnostics, prognostics, data and predictive analytics, CBM, smart manufacturing, health and asset management of machines and engineering systems. Previously program office lead for the JSF PHM effort. Current President of the PHM Society.

  • Mona Witkowski

    Project Manager / Deputy Project Manager, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: OCO-2 Project Manager, CloudSat Deputy Project Manager and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Follow-On Operations Mission Manager at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Over 40 years of experience at JPL in spacecraft development, operations, risk management and mission assurance. Recipient of NASA Exceptional Service Medal for TOPEX/Poseidon Mission Assurance and NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal for Deep Space Network Risk Management.

  • Michael Machado

    International Earth Science Constellation Mission Operations Manager, NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center: Mike has nearly 30 years of Mission Operations experience as either a contractor or civil servant at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. He advanced through the ranks as an online flight operations spacecraft analyst, mission planner, spacecraft lead engineer and manager. He has supported both Space Science Mission Operations (SSMO) and Earth Science Mission Operations (ESMO) covering a diverse group of science gathering missions in orbits ranging from near earth to geosynchronous and deep space). He has worked all phases of mission operations: pre-launch, integration and testing, launch & early orbit, normal, decommissioning and end of mission. Most recently, Mike has been the International Earth Science Constellation Mission Operations Manager as well as the Associate Branch Head for the GSFC Mission Validation and Operations Branch (Code 584). In these roles, Mike has enjoyed building relationships with mission representatives both internal to NASA and from other agencies (NOAA, USAF, USGS, etc) and international partners (CNES, DLR, ESA, JAXA, etc). In his free time, Mike enjoys trying to keep up with several hobbies such as tennis, soccer, poker, disc golf, science fiction and travel with his family (wife and toddler).

  • 12.01 Orbital, Surface and Payload/Instrument Mission Operations

    This session solicits papers which highlight innovative approaches for conducting spacecraft orbital, surface and payload/instrument mission operations. Responding to in-flight anomalies, mission operations challenges, automation, risk reduction and space debris collision avoidance are also topics that are encouraged. Additional topics solicited include: challenges to managing single or multi-mission operations, managing multiple payloads, operating satellite constellations, small satellite operations, team development, staffing, cost reduction and lessons learned for future missions.

    • Mona Witkowski

      Project Manager / Deputy Project Manager, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: OCO-2 Project Manager, CloudSat Deputy Project Manager and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Follow-On Operations Mission Manager at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Over 40 years of experience at JPL in spacecraft development, operations, risk management and mission assurance. Recipient of NASA Exceptional Service Medal for TOPEX/Poseidon Mission Assurance and NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal for Deep Space Network Risk Management.

    • Heidi Hallowell

      Staff Consultant GNC Engineer, Ball Aerospace: Heidi Hallowell received B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte in Electrical Engineering. During her 21 years at Ball, Heidi has worked in a variety of GNC roles including spacecraft design and development, simulators, on-orbit commissioning, and spacecraft operation. These programs have included both LEO and interplanetary spacecraft. She has been the CloudSat ADCS lead since 2018 and is also the lead ADCS engineer for the S-NPP and JPSS-1/NOAA-20 programs.

  • 12.02 Mission Planning, Mission Operations Systems and Ground Architectures

    This session focuses on the design, development and implementation of mission operations systems, ground data systems and flight-ground interfaces. Topics may include: methods and technologies that support all aspects of mission design, development, planning, testing, and operations. This can include areas related to uplink (e.g., procedures, planning, scheduling, commanding/sequencing), downlink (e.g., telemetry and data processing and analysis, and response) and strategic planning. We also welcome ideas related to the design, integration, and automation of efficient ground systems. Submissions will be evaluated primarily on novelty, technical innovation, and broader impact to the planning and operations communities.

    • Kedar Naik

      Staff Consultant - AI Technical Lead, BAE Systems, Space & Mission Systems: Kedar Naik is a Staff Consultant and Artificial Intelligence Technical Lead at BAE Space & Mission Systems. He specializes in machine-learning applications related to spacecraft autonomy, thermal control, adaptive optics, spectral remote sensing, and ground operations. Prior to joining Ball, he was at Northrop Grumman, researching the application of machine learning to cyber-security problems. His professional and research interests lie in machine learning, design optimization, and computational math. He has a Ph.D. from Stanford University, where he was a member of the Aerospace Design Lab, under the direction of Prof. Juan Alonso. He was an NDSEG Fellow from 2009 to 2013 and – during the course of his academic career – he completed internships at NASA Langley, NASA Glenn, the U.S. Army’s Aeroflightdynamics Directorate, and Pratt & Whitney. In addition to his doctorate, he holds a master’s degree from Stanford University and a bachelor’s from the University of Southern California.

    • Rob Lange

      Mission System Systems Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Rob Lange is a Mission System Systems Engineer (MSSE) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with more than 20 years experience developing and operating flagship class missions. Rob is currently the MSSE for the Sample Retrieval Lander mission. He was the Mars 2020 Mission Planning Lead, and later the MSSE and surface operations commissioning Phase Lead. Previously, Rob worked on the Mars Science Laboratory in Mission System development and operations teams as commissioning phase planning lead, surface phase system engineering, surface operations strategic planning. Prior experience includes Mars Exploration Rovers science operations and Cassini spacecraft operations science planning engineer. Rob received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Michigan and M.S. in Systems Engineering from the University of Southern California.

  • 12.03 Human Space Flight Development, Processing, and Operations

    This session focuses on all aspects of Human Spaceflight development, processing, and operations across all mission phases. Research topics include the design, development and operations of manned spacecraft and extraterrestrial destination hardware and support systems. Operations research focused on human pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight activities is also encouraged. Additionally, research dedicated to specific areas such as mission analogs, flight operations including IVA and EVA, launching, landing, and recovery of crewed spacecraft, and the effects on human beings during all mission types and phases is also encouraged.

    • Michael Lee

      Deputy Manager, Mission Management & Integration, NASA - Kennedy Space Center: NASA Deputy Manager, Mission Management & Integration, Commercial Crew Program, Kennedy Space Center; 36 years experience in spacecraft mission & ground operations, Systems Integration, and Project Management. Was the NASA Mission Manager for the SpaceX Demo 1 mission to ISS in March 2019. Earned a B.S., in Aerospace Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, and a M.S., in Space Systems Operations, Florida Institute of Technology.

    • William Koenig

      Production Operations Lead, NASA - Kennedy Space Center: William J Koenig Received a B.S. Degree in Marine Transportation from the United States Merchant Marine Academy and a M.S. Degree in Industrial Engineering from the University of Central Florida. He worked in the maritime industry for 8 years before entering the aerospace industry and supporting the Space Shuttle Program in numerous managerial positions for 20 years. In 2007 William joined NASA as the ORION Program Lead for Production Operations. He is presently responsible for supporting the fabrication, transportation, assembly, integration and checkout of the Artemis ORION spacecraft and associated components at Kennedy Space Center.

  • 12.04 Resilient and Cyber Secure Systems for Mission Operations

    Cyber secure, resilient space systems are necessary to ensure continuity of operations and operators ability to execute their missions successfully. This session welcomes novel approaches, tailored to the aerospace domain, for ground systems as well as those spanning both space and ground segments. Examples of resilient operational technologies and systems include: cryptography, architectures (e.g. Zero Trust Architectures (ZTA)), compute and network infrastructure (e.g. redundant, failover systems), software, root of trust (RoT), intrusion detection/prevention, vulnerability/red team assessments, approaches to simplify and streamline Risk Management Framework (RMF) implementations, access control and others. We are also interested in applications of advanced technologies like AI-based analytics, blockchain, active defense, embedded agents, lessons learned in attempted attacks/breaches. Note: if presenting on vulnerabilities, please follow responsible disclosure practices to ensure operators' abilities to protect their systems.

    • John Kenworthy

      Senior Manager Manager, BAE Systems: Mr. John Kenworthy is a Senior Manager at BAE Systems/Space and Mission Systems focused on a portfolio providing mission resiliency and survivability. John manages the Military Space system strategy, technology roadmaps, cultivating novel technologies, delivering operational systems, and capturing new business within this portfolio. Prior to working at BAE, as a U.S. Air Force civilian, John conducted cyber security vulnerability research, analysis, and assessments for satellite programs. He developed his cyber security skills focusing on national critical infrastructure conducting red team events to inform customers of potential security vulnerabilities and training customers in how to mitigate cyber security risks. At Lockheed Martin, John developed spacecraft fault protection and the flight software/systems team, supporting flight operations and software development for numerous NASA interplanetary spacecraft missions. As a fault protection engineer, John was on-console supporting mission operations for many interplanetary spacecraft critical events and anomaly recoveries. John holds a bachelor’s degree in Mathematics and Computer Science from the University of Puget Sound and a master’s degree in Computer Science from the University of Denver. John attended the Budapest Semesters in Mathematics program as a National Security Education Program David L. Boren Scholar.

  • 12.05 Automation and Machine Learning Applications in Spacecraft Operations

    This session invites contributions that are concerned with the applications of machine learning and data science techniques to deal with the increasing amounts of data being collected in spacecraft operations on flight and/or ground segments. These techniques could be related to any subsystem of the spacecraft, including telecom, power, thermal, or specific instrument data and that of the ground segments. Topics ranging from theoretical and conceptual treatment in these areas to specific and operational treatments are solicited. The benefits of these techniques are very wide in scope from enhancing operator productivity by providing diagnostic tools that detect and explain causes of anomalous behavior either in real-time or by post-processing, to automating mission operations. These benefits are also crucial for smaller missions, such as the emerging CubeSats missions, that typically have very lean teams. Some consideration is made for the computing platforms required for the algorithms.

    • Zaid Towfic

      Group Supervisor, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Zaid Towfic holds a B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Computer Science and Mathematics from the University of Iowa. He received his Electrical Engineering M.S. in 2009 and Ph.D. in 2014, both from UCLA, where he focused on signal processing, machine learning, and stochastic optimization. After receiving his Ph. D., Zaid joined the MIT Lincoln Laboratory where he worked on distributed beam forming and geolocation, interference excision via subspace methods, simultaneous communication, and electronic warfare. Zaid joined the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in January of 2017 and has been focused on machine learning and signal processing efforts. He is currently the group supervisor of the Reprogrammable Signal Processing Group of the Flight Telecommunication Section.

    • Dennis Ogbe

      Signal Analysis Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Dennis O. Ogbe (S’13, M’20) is a member of the Reprogrammable Signal Processing group at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA. Prior to joining JPL, he was a postdoctoral associate in the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech in Arlington, VA, followed by a stint as a software-defined radio engineer at Lynk in Falls Church, VA. He holds a B.S. in electrical engineering from Tennessee Technological University and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Purdue University. His research interests are in the fields of communication theory, signal processing, computer engineering, and their application to aerospace engineering problems.

  • 12.06 Robotics, Autonomy and Operations

    This sessions addresses the challenges and opportunities of space robotics autonomy and operations. Topics include autonomous systems, robotics, perception, machine learning, AI and their practical application to space robotics. Papers are solicited that discuss approaches for operating spacecraft with autonomous capabilities, advances in onboard and ground automation and tools, software and systems engineering for operability, fault tolerance and recovery, and human-robot interaction for both manned and unmanned missions. Approaches that address the unique challenges that come with operating robots in space, such as risk, uncertainty, harsh environment, communication delays, and limited resources are also encouraged, as are analyses of successes and challenges, highlights of latest trends, technologies, and best practices that can be leveraged to operate robots effectively in space.

    • Vandi Verma

      Deputy Manager Mobility and Robotic Systems Section, NASA JPL-Caltech: Vandi Verma is the Deputy Manager for Mobility and Robotics Systems at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the Chief Engineer of Robotic Operations for the Mars 2020 mission with the Perseverance rover and Ingenuity helicopter. As Deputy Manager for Mobility and Robotics she leads about 200 JPL roboticists developing new technology for future missions and working on a variety of JPL robotic missions. Robotics capabilities she has worked on are in regular use on the Perseverance, and Curiosity rovers, and in human spaceflight projects. She has been engaged in robotic operations on Mars since 2008 with the Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity, Curiosity rover, Perseverance rover, and Ingenuity helicopter. She graduated from CMU RI with a Ph.D. in Robotics in 2005.

    • Alexandra Holloway

      Flight Software Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Alexandra Holloway leads JPL's Mars Science Laboratory flight software team in developing new capabilities and fixing bugs with embedded software on Mars. Also a member of the data management team, she assesses file system data coming from the spacecraft and writes uplink products to keep the hard drives squeaky clean. Previously, Alexandra used ethnographic techniques to understand Deep Space Network operators' the workflows and design new tools for improved efficiency in a bursty environment.